Slightly curtailed

What I've been up to

I do apologise for the brevity of today's Gentle Readers. We were almost at the point of getting a house to rent in Salford, when the landlord said that he couldn't rent to people without a full-time job. Now, I'm a Python/Django contractor when I'm not being a poet-- actually, that's untrue: I'm always a poet, even when I'm being a programmer-- but apparently that isn't good enough, so the whole arrangement fell through and we're back to square one. So, as you may imagine, the time I had planned for writing this was swallowed up by the altogether less pleasant business of attempting to fix the problem. I hope to have everything back to normal, in both ways, by Thursday.

A poem

I wrote this one on top of a bus when I was first living away from home in Becontree in the mid-nineties. I can't tell you what it means, for I don't really know; I wrote it for the sound. I may set it to music one day.

I wrote this one on top of a bus when I was first living away from home in Becontree in the mid-nineties. I can't tell you what it means, for I don't really know; I wrote it for the sound. I may set it to music one day.

Hallelujah Simpkins, Syllogism Brown,
Wandered up to Barkingside to walk around the town.
Does it make you wonder, when they ring the bell,
How they press the organ keys and sing along as well?
Syllogism wondered so he climbed the tower to see;
Hallelujah, Simpkins said, I know that I am free.

Hallelujah Simpkins, Pendlebury Jane,
Hurried to the hospital and hurried home again.
Does it make you wonder, when they run so fast,
How they know they'll ever reach the hospital at last?
Pendlebury wondered even though she couldn't run,
Hallelujah, Simpkins said, today I have a son.

Hallelujah Simpkins, Academic Smith,
Never et an orange if they couldn't eat the pith.
Does it make you wonder, if oranges can float,
Why they catch the Underground and never catch a boat?
Academic wondered so he went and caught the train;
Hallelujah, Simpkins said, and said it once again.

Hallelujah Simpkins, Concertina Flight,
Hear the song the angels sing in Dagenham tonight!
Does it make you wonder, climbing Heaven's stair,
How you'd speak to Hallelujah Simpkins, if he's there?
Simpkins only wondered whom he followed as he soared;
Hallelujah, Simpkins said, and glory to the Lord!

A picture

A crow's ear
Fig. 1: a crow's ear

Another poem

This is famous already, but justly so.

This is famous already, but justly so.

"You are old, Father William," the young man said,
"And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
Do you think, at your age, it is right?"

"In my youth," Father William replied to his son,
"I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again!"

"You are old," said the youth, "as I mentioned before,
And you have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
Pray, what is the reason for that?"

"In my youth," said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
"I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment— one shilling the box—
Allow me to sell you a couple?"

"You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
Pray, how did you manage to do it?"

"In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life."

"You are old," said the youth, "one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose—
What made you so awfully clever?"

"I have answered three questions, and that is enough,"
said his father. "Don't give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you downstairs!"

This is one of the most deft of Carroll's parodies, so memorable that it stuck in my head without my taking the trouble to learn it, and as with many of them it has become better known than the original. The original isn't a particularly bad poem, but awfully preachy, and executed with rather less skill than Carroll's. Nevertheless, its author was no stranger to a good joke (see To a goose in GR 2014-06-09 ), and I think he would have enjoyed Carroll's take on his work.

THE OLD MAN'S COMFORTS, AND HOW HE GAINED THEM
by Robert Southey

"You are old, father William," the young man cried,
"The few locks which are left you are grey;
You are hale, father William, a hearty old man;
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"In the days of my youth," father William replied,
"I remembered that youth would fly fast,
And abused not my health and my vigour at first,
That I never might need them at last."

"You are old, father William," the young man cried,
"And pleasures with youth pass away.
And yet you lament not the days that are gone;
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"In the days of my youth," father William replied,
"I remembered that youth could not last;
I thought of the future, whatever I did,
That I never might grieve for the past."

"You are old, father William," the young man cried,
"And life must be hastening away;
You are cheerful and love to converse upon death;
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"I am cheerful, young man," father William replied,
"Let the cause thy attention engage;
In the days of my youth I remembered my God!
And He hath not forgotten my age."

"You are cheerful and love to converse upon death." Bet he was a riot at parties.
This is one of the most deft of Carroll's parodies, so memorable that it stuck in my head without my taking the trouble to learn it, and as with many of them it has become better known than the original. The original isn't a particularly bad poem, but awfully preachy, and executed with rather less skill than Carroll's. Nevertheless, its author was no stranger to a good joke (see To a goose in GR 2014-06-09), and I think he would have enjoyed Carroll's take on his work.

_THE OLD MAN 'S COMFORTS, AND HOW HE GAINED THEM
by Robert Southey

"You are old, father William," the young man cried,
"The few locks which are left you are grey;
You are hale, father William, a hearty old man;
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"In the days of my youth," father William replied,
"I remembered that youth would fly fast,
And abused not my health and my vigour at first,
That I never might need them at last."

"You are old, father William," the young man cried,
"And pleasures with youth pass away.
And yet you lament not the days that are gone;
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"In the days of my youth," father William replied,
"I remembered that youth could not last;
I thought of the future, whatever I did,
That I never might grieve for the past."

"You are old, father William," the young man cried,
"And life must be hastening away;
You are cheerful and love to converse upon death;
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"I am cheerful, young man," father William replied,
"Let the cause thy attention engage;
In the days of my youth I remembered my God!
And He hath not forgotten my age."_

"You are cheerful and love to converse upon death." Bet he was a riot at parties.